Stockman Farrar Group - REALTY EXECUTIVES | Waltham, MA Real Estate, Watertown, MA Real Estate


This Multi-Family in Malden, MA recently sold for $599,000. This style home was sold by Stockman Farrar Group - REALTY EXECUTIVES.


598 Highland Ave, Malden, MA 02148

Multi-Family

$599,000
Price
$599,000
Sale Price

2
Units
1,641
Approx. GLA
Walk to the T Malden West End 2 family! This solid multi is perfect for an owner occupant or to add to your investment portfolio. The vacant 2nd floor unit has a tidy kitchen, 2 bedrooms with the ability to be a 3 bedroom, hardwood floors and a 10 year old Burnham gas heating system. The 2nd bedroom upstairs has plenty of closet space, wall to wall carpeting, skylights and recessed lighting. The house has a roof that is approximately 10 years old. There is a 2 car garage and enough parking in the driveway for multiple cars. The house has easy highway access and is close to everything Malden and the surrounding towns have to offer. The 2nd floor unit has nice hardwood floors and wall to wall carpeting. First floor tenant has been there approximately 5 years and is a tenant at will. Offers will be presented as they come!

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Boosting the value of your home doesn’t have to require huge renovation projects, thousands of dollars, and months of planning. Making small, tactful home improvements can do the trick just as well.

The key to making desirable home improvements is to follow well-established building and design principles. Don’t worry about the latest trends or trying to reinvent the wheel.

In this post, we’ll tell you how to do just that so your home can be market ready in no time. Here are the top ten improvements for your home that cost $100 or less.

1. Add fixtures to the most outdated room of your home

Most people tend to renovate their homes one room at a time. If you have that one room that’s keeping your home in the past, bring it up to speed by replacing the fixtures; whether that’s a new faucet, doorknobs, or other hardware.

2. Shine the light on your hard work

A dark room feels smaller, older, and less put together. Abundant lighting is an excellent way to make your home feel larger and more welcoming.

3. Paint the front door and mailbox

It’s all about curb appeal. Refresh the outside of your home by putting a fresh coat of paint on your front door and mailbox. Bright, bold colors are sure to help your home stand apart from the neighbors while still fitting in.

4. Powerwash exterior surfaces

For $50 you can rent a pressure washer and clean up your vinyl siding, decks, walkways, and driveways. That’s a lot of value and square footage for a small investment.

5. Buy a “luxury shower head”

You can find spa-style shower heads on Amazon for less than $40 that look great and will make your home feel a bit more luxurious.

6. Stage to sell

Buy some modern wall art and large plants and ditch the family heirlooms for when it comes time to sell. These additions will make it easier for prospective buyers to picture themselves living in your home.

7. Mirrors are magic

Mirrors can be used in a number of places around the home to create the illusion of spaciousness in rooms that are otherwise lacking. There are plenty of creative uses for mirrors for each room of the home.

8. Ditch the linoleum

Underneath those linoleum floors lies wood that might be able to be refurbished. Don’t worry about small dings; they add character.

9. Get ready for the welcome party

Buy a fresh doormat and replace an old doorbell to make visitors feel like they’re entering a brand new home.

10. Cable management is king

Hide those cables in the office and living room by tying them behind displays or running wires underneath carpets or behind the drywall. This can instantly make your home feel more clean and put-together.



 Photo by Heung Soon via Pixabay

A moving checklist won't take all the stress out of moving, but it can relieve a lot of the pressure once you have everything accounted for. To give yourself a little extra sanity and peace of mind, we'll sketch out what a reasonable timeline should look like. 

8 Weeks Before 

Nearly two months before the move, you should begin going through each room and deciding what you're going to move and what you're going to throw away. You can start calling movers for quotes and ordering everything from bubble wrap to packaging tape.

It's important to keep the daily routine as-is, while still mentally preparing for the move. Start dropping off donation boxes of clothes or goods that won't be coming with you, and organize all of your correspondence in one place so it's easier to keep track of. We recommend having movers visit the home to give their quote as over-the-phone estimates may be unreliable. 

4 Weeks Before 

A month before the move is a good time to start packing up rarely used items, so they're ready to go when the time comes. This is also an opportunity to be even more ruthless with what you take versus what you leave behind. The more you get rid of now, the less you'll have to worry about organizing in the new home.

Start separating out valuables, measuring furniture, and filling out change-of-addresses with everyone from your credit card companies to the DMV. (Never assume a blanket change-of-address form will be valid for all organizations.) Store valuables in a safe, label boxes, and take a deep breath before the home stretch.  

Last Few Days 

Now is the time to get everything in a box besides the absolute necessities (e.g., toothbrushes, etc.) Refill any prescriptions so you aren't dependent on your new local pharmacy processing all of your paperwork immediately.  Defrost the freezer now if you're taking it with you, and tune-up all vehicles so they're ready for the journey.

Create a manifest with everything you're taking and call the movers to confirm the final details. The final days are where things can really start to fall apart, and these are all preventative measures you can take so you're not dealing with a broken-down car filled with boxes on the side of the road. 

Remember that moves rarely ever go according to plan. A moving schedule is dependent on everything from the weather to road conditions. This checklist is really just a way to curtail the possibilities of a major disaster. At the very least, it should help you feel more in control even during the most chaotic parts of the move. 


Image by Pexels from Pixabay

When you list your home for sale, you will have people you don't know exploring the property -- and while real estate agents will supervise them, you will still have extra foot traffic in your home. You can work with your listing agent to ensure that visiting buyers are properly vetted (new listings often attract curious visitors that are not interested in buying, just touring the home). You can also take steps to protect your property during open houses and showings. A security system isn't beneficial -- because the people admitted to your home for a showing have permission to be there. Here's what to do before you list your home to protect your possessions from theft or harm. Most people are well-intentioned and the vast majority of showings are trouble-free but preparing to show your home can give you peace of mind and preserve your privacy and possessions, too. 

Replace originals: If you have original works of art as focal points in some rooms, you may want to replace them with prints, reproductions or lesser works while your home is on the market. Consider having artwork professionally packed by an art historian or specialty mover before your home goes on the market and you won't have to worry about it being in an empty home.  Note that even well-intentioned visitors could damage original art simply by touching it, so evaluate which pieces should stay on display when you show your home. 

Remove small electronics: Your wall mounted flat screen is safe during showings since it is simply too awkward to remove and tote away, but smaller pieces could be at risk. Small electronics like phones, tablets and games should be removed or secured before a showing. These items may also contain your personal information and secure data, so putting them away can protect your privacy, too. 

Secure or remove personal items: Jewelry and other small items should be removed from the home or placed in a safe or other secure location. Even if you don't have a conventional jewelry box or valet on display, consider removing especially valuable or sentimental items while your home is on on the market. 

Most visitors are honest, authentic buyers. However, if you have concerns about theft or damage, sweep your home before you list it and secure or replace any important items.


When it comes to getting what you want in your home, the question comes down to whether you build it or look for the perfect house to buy.

For those who prefer new construction, the option of starting from scratch is very viable. Here are some vital factors to consider before getting started:

1. Cost

Building a new house from scratch may seem costly, but after an extensive breakdown and with proper management of resources, it may turn out to be less expensive than buying a home that you then must remodel to suit your taste. It is essential to do a total cost analysis to avoid slowdowns during the construction.

2. Flexibility

Flexibility is one factor that people who prefer to build new houses mention. They can modify the house to their taste without having to fit into a preset structure. If customization is a priority for you, this is a great place to start. You’ll have much more flexibility in the layout of your home and will be able to customize it to your liking.

3. Duration

Building your home requires many choices: finding the land and hiring a contractor to accompany you throughout your project are possibly top priority. From design to site monitoring, until the delivery of keys, it is essential to work with a professional with recognized expertise, who will respond carefully to your needs and expectations.

Finally, a new construction project offers you the opportunity to live in a house that is 100% personalized and scalable. This means that your property will be designed to adapt to the new configurations of your home, for years to come.

But not everyone enjoys the scouting and building process. Sometimes it’s difficult to imagine how the home will look and work for you based on drawings alone. If the time frame gets interrupted, you may have to find temporary housing to wait out the weather, material supply issues, or other delays common to new construction. When developing raw land, you often must factor in roads, driveways, sidewalks, and streetlamps. Purchasing a preexisting home can either diminish or eliminate these issues all together.

Need help making the decision? Contact me! Whether it's a beautiful, preexisting home or a dream built from the ground up, I’d love to help you move into your dream house!




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